MBA Polymers Inc founded a fully owned subsidiary in India

MBA Polymers Inc founded a fully owned subsidiary in India in order to develope a waste management and post-consumer plastic production unit in Pune, India. The new MBA plant shall utilise up to 100.000 mt of electronic and automotive plastic waste in order to produce post consumer plastic for the booming Indian and Asian market. MBA Polymers is targeting to service new Indian customers and its international customer from 2019 onwards. MBA Polymers Inc has appointed Mr Piyush Brahmin and Hansel Scherz as the Technical and Commercial General Manger.

More work for Worksop as demand soars at MBA Polymers UK

Worksop based plastics recycling company, MBA Polymers, is set to increase its production capacity on October 1st 2017. This increase will create 8 new jobs and result in an additional 600 metric tonnes of mixed plastic being diverted from landfill.

MBA Polymers UK, which recycles plastics from automotive shredder residue (ASR) and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), has reported an increase in demand for all of its products. In particular, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and Polystyrene (PS), which is sold into a variety of applications including automotive interiors, electronics and cosmetic casings, are in high demand from Europe and the US.

“This is an exciting step for MBA Polymers. The increase in capacity will accommodate the extra demand for product, whilst also allowing us to explore new product development”, said Paul Mayhew, MBA Polymers General Manager.

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Notes to editors

MBA Polymers Inc., is a world leader in the production of post-consumer recycled plastics. We source 100% of our feedstock from post-consumer goods diverted from landfill or incineration, and our proprietary process means that a single tonne of our recycled product saves approximately 4.8 tons of CO2 compared with the manufacture of virgin materials.

MBA Polymers UK is a JV with EMR (European Metal Recycling), one of the world’s largest metal recyclers with approximately 170 facilities globally. Please visit EMR’s website http://emrgroup.com/ for more information on the Group and recent developments.

Release date: September 12th 2017

Ref: PR024

For further information please contact

The Press Office
Email : marketing@emrgroup.com

Tel: 01925 715400
Web: mbapolymers.com

emrgroup.com

 

MBA Polymers UK

Sandy Lane

Worksop,

Nottinghamshire S80 3ET

England

 

EMR

Sirius House

Delta Crescent

Warrington

WA5 7NS

EMR: leading the way in scrap metal recycling

Our joint venture partner EMR is a prime example of another successful recycling pioneer. With heritage dating back to the 1940s, the company now employs 3,500 people and operates at 150 locations worldwide. Its core business is recycling scrap metal from sources such as end-of-life vehicles, consumer products and industrial, construction and demolition waste, with sales of ten million tonnes of recycled raw materials annually (spanning 100 grades of recycled metals).

The company invests in advanced plants and equipment, with a view to maximising operational efficiency and attaining the highest possible recycling rates. Consequently, it is well on the way to becoming the first company in its sector to achieve ‘zero waste’ status.

EMR and MBA Polymers invested in their joint venture Worksop facility in 2010. Since then, the company has supplied us with high quality shredder residue from end-of-life vehicles. EMR removes the battery, wheels and other hazardous vehicle parts before removing all operating fluids with purpose-built de-pollution rigs. It then shreds the remaining ferrous, non-ferrous and waste electrical equipment using vast shredding machines that can recycle a car every 15 seconds – giving a processing rate of up to 5000 cars each day.

“Metal recycling has been thriving in the UK for some time but has often been cast into the shadows, as the media tends to focus on the more tangible topic of household waste,” says Graeme Carus, Business Development Director, EMR. “However, it plays a vital role in preserving valuable resources and in diverting waste from landfill. Some two million UK vehicles are classed as ‘end-of-life’ each year, so recycling these vehicles effectively is essential if we are to close the loop on vehicle waste.”

“Our partnership with EMR is important,” comments Nigel Hunton, CEO, MBA Polymers. “It ensures we receive a steady stream of high quality shredder residue to our Worksop plant, which in turn boosts the volume of secondary raw materials we can sell and keeps more end-of-life vehicle materials in use for longer.”

UK: Potential world leader in recycling

The UK could be a world leader in recycling, Carus believes. Firstly, being a small, densely populated island, a lot of post consumer material can be ‘mined’ in a limited geographical area. Secondly, European directives (WEEE and ELV initiatives) and the UK Landfill Tax (which stands at £72 per tonne and will rise to £80 per tonne in April 2014), provide additional stimuli for change. Investors are gaining confidence in recycling infrastructure projects, Carus explains, now that Landfill Tax stands at more than ten times the original 1996 rate of £7 per tonne.

Technology is also advancing apace, enhancing automated separation methods with modern colour sorting systems, high powered magnets, density separation and electrostatics. The final piece in the jigsaw will come from the use of advanced thermal recovery processes to turn the residual non-recyclable fractions into energy. EMR is currently building a thermal recovery facility in the West Midlands. All of this activity is creating jobs. Meanwhile, the business world is showing a genuine interest and increased urgency in stepping up efforts on recycling, as sustainable business discussions continue.

However, despite the technological advances and regulatory incentives, competing for space with other land needs is a real challenge, Doing more recycling means more space is required. Recycling facilities are often located on the outskirts of urban areas, Carus explains, which is exactly where new residential and light commercial development is taking place, as heavier industry drops away. Being located close to residential areas can lead to conflict over noise levels or operating hours.

“The reality is that if we are to increase the volume of waste recycled in the UK, we need more sites and waste handling facilities to do it,” says Carus. I would like to see a more balanced approach to planning control with local and regional waste management plans based on accurately assessed need. It’s also important to ensure that new developments respect the existing character of an area.”

MBA recently met with Vince Cable, UK Secretary of State for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills to discuss how to catalyse the UK recycling market. Reducing the barriers to obtaining planning permission and creating more economic incentives were among the topics covered. We’ll keep you posted on any developments.

MBA Polymers UK, appoints new General Manager

Worksop based plastics recycling company, MBA Polymers UK, has announced the appointment of Paul Mayhew as its General Manager, with immediate effect.

Paul has over 10 years experience within the recycled plastics sector and has been with the company for 4 years. In his new role he will be responsible for all areas of the company and for leading the company’s ambition to increase volumes and continually improve product quality.

His appointment comes as MBA Polymers UK prepares to increase its production capacity, creating 8 new jobs and resulting in an additional 600 metric tonnes of mixed plastic waste being diverted from landfill.

EMR Director Anthony Marrett commented, “Paul has been a key team member in helping the company move towards its goals. With our recent increase in capacity and the growth of our team, I am confident that Paul will be successful in helping us to provide our customers with an excellent service.”

 

– ends –

 Notes to editors

MBA Polymers Inc, is a world leader in the production of post-consumer recycled plastics. We source 100% of our feedstock from post-consumer goods diverted from landfill or incineration, and our proprietary process means that a single tonne of our recycled product saves approximately 4.8 tons of CO2 compared with the manufacture of virgin materials.

MBA Polymers UK is a JV with EMR (European Metal Recycling), one of the world’s largest metal recyclers with approximately 170 facilities globally. Please visit EMR’s website http://emrgroup.com/ for more information on the Group and recent developments.

Release date: September 14th 2017

Ref: PR025

 

For further information please contact

The Press Office
Email: marketing@emrgroup.com

Tel: 01925 715400
Web: mbapolymers.com

emrgroup.com

 

MBA Polymers UK

Sandy Lane

Worksop

Nottinghamshire S80 3ET

England

 

EMR

Sirius House

Delta Crescent

Warrington

WA5 7NS

MBA Polymers UK, Appoints New Quality and Technical Manager

 

Worksop based plastics recycling company, MBA Polymers, has strengthened its team with the appointment of experienced Quality and Technical Manager, Bryn Williams.

Bryn joined the firm in August 2017 to support the team in creating high quality products and develop the company’s product portfolio. Bryn comes with a wealth of experience, a BSc in Chemistry, further education in Polymer Technology and 20 years involvement in the industry. His previous positions include Product Development Manager and Quality Manager at BPI Recycled Products.

Bryn commented, “I’m delighted to be leading the Quality and Technical functions of MBA Polymers. I’ll work hard to further improve the consistency and performance of our existing range of grades, whilst increasing our offering in line with market changes.”

Paul Mayhew, General Manager said, “We are very pleased to welcome Bryn to the team. We are commited to being a true innovator in our industry and I’m confident that Bryn will play a key role in providing and implementing high quality solutions and support for our customers.”

– ends –

Notes to editors

MBA Polymers is a world leader in the production of post-consumer recycled plastics. We source 100% of our feedstock from post-consumer goods diverted from landfill or incineration, and our proprietary process means that a single tonne of our recycled product saves approximately 4.8 tons of CO2 compared with the manufacture of virgin materials.

MBA Polymers UK is a JV with EMR (European Metal Recycling), one of the world’s largest metal recyclers with approximately 150 facilities globally. Please visit EMR’s website http://emrgroup.com/ for more information on the Group and recent developments.

Release date: September 20th 2017

Ref: PR026

For further information please contact

The Press Office
Email : pr@mbapolymers.com / marketing@emrgroup.com

Tel: 01925 715400
Web: mbapolymers.com / emrgroup.com

 

MBA Polymers UK

Sandy Lane

Worksop,

Nottinghamshire S80 3ET

England

 

EMR

Sirius House

Delta Crescent

Warrington

WA5 7NS

MBA Polymers Inc. has been taken over by Elephant Equity

Elephant Equity has taken over 100% of the shares of MBA Polymers Inc. Elephant Equity aims to further develop the recycling technology and to establish new plastic production facilities in promising markets. Elephant Equity will integrate MBA Polymers in its other waste management, recycling and engineering activities in Europe and Asia. New CEO of MBA Polymers Inc. will be Dr. Felix-Michael Weber, entrepreneur and waste-management specialist with an extensive track-record developing new businesses and global expansion.

Clearing plastic from the world’s coastlines

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers stepped up to help clear the world’s coastlines of plastic waste as part of the Ocean Conservancy’s recent International Coastal Clean-up this autumn. The annual clean-up event is the world’s largest single day volunteer effort to remove rubbish from local waterways, beaches, lakes and rivers.

This year, volunteers used an Ocean Conservancy app to document every piece of rubbish collected, logging it in the Ocean Trash Index, the world’s largest marine debris database. Some 11.5m volunteers have logged 225m items removed from beaches and waterways over the past 30 years.

Plastic ocean waste is harmful to marine environments and wildlife, and has already harmed nearly 700 species of wildlife. Every year, an estimated 8m tonnes of plastic waste flows into the ocean, the majority of it discarded by people on land. Without strong global action, the volume of plastic in the world’s oceans could soon equal the volume of fish, prompting significant environmental, economic and health issues.

“Marine debris is a serious concern for the health of our oceans,” says Allison Schutes, who manages Ocean Conservancy’s ‘Trash-Free Seas’ programme. “Fortunately, this is a problem that we can solve,” she adds, highlighting that through the clean-up event, the Ocean Conservancy gains a glimpse of the many people across the world working towards cleaner oceans.

“Recycling more plastic is vital to stemming the flow of plastic waste into the world’s oceans,” says Richard McCombs, MBA’s CEO. “By transforming post-consumer plastics into secondary raw materials, we are giving plastic waste a new lease of life and preventing it from becoming marine debris.”

Clearing plastic from the world’s coastlines

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers stepped up to help clear the world’s coastlines of plastic waste as part of the Ocean Conservancy’s recent International Coastal Clean-up this autumn. The annual clean-up event is the world’s largest single day volunteer effort to remove rubbish from local waterways, beaches, lakes and rivers.

This year, volunteers used an Ocean Conservancy app to document every piece of rubbish collected, logging it in the Ocean Trash Index, the world’s largest marine debris database. Some 11.5m volunteers have logged 225m items removed from beaches and waterways over the past 30 years.

Plastic ocean waste is harmful to marine environments and wildlife, and has already harmed nearly 700 species of wildlife. Every year, an estimated 8m tonnes of plastic waste flows into the ocean, the majority of it discarded by people on land. Without strong global action, the volume of plastic in the world’s oceans could soon equal the volume of fish, prompting significant environmental, economic and health issues.

“Marine debris is a serious concern for the health of our oceans,” says Allison Schutes, who manages Ocean Conservancy’s ‘Trash-Free Seas’ programme. “Fortunately, this is a problem that we can solve,” she adds, highlighting that through the clean-up event, the Ocean Conservancy gains a glimpse of the many people across the world working towards cleaner oceans.

“Recycling more plastic is vital to stemming the flow of plastic waste into the world’s oceans,” says Richard McCombs, MBA’s CEO. “By transforming post-consumer plastics into secondary raw materials, we are giving plastic waste a new lease of life and preventing it from becoming marine debris.”

Sweden set to introduce tax breaks for repairs

The Swedish government is set to introduce tax breaks for repairs to everything from bicycles to washing machines, reports the Guardian. The idea is that it will no longer make sense for people to discard old or broken items and replace them with new ones. If the proposals are approved by parliament in December 2016, they will become law from 1st January 2017.

In particular, the proposals attempt to address consumers’ ‘throwaway’ mentality by cutting VAT on repairs to bicycles, clothes and shoes from 25% to 12%. People would also be able to claim back half of the labour cost (from income tax) on repairs to appliances such as fridges, ovens, dishwashers and washing machines.

“We believe that this could substantially lower the cost and so make it more rational economic behaviour to repair goods,” commented Per Bolund, Sweden’s minister for financial markets and consumer affairs and one of six Green party cabinet members.

Bolund estimates that the VAT cut will reduce the cost of a repair worth 400 SEK (£36) by about 50 SEK, enough to stimulate the country’s repair industry. According to the Guardian, he hopes the tax break on appliances will spur the creation of a new home repairs service industry, providing much-needed jobs for new immigrants who lack formal education.

These incentives are part of the Swedish government’s efforts to expand its focus from reducing domestic carbon emissions to addressing the carbon footprint of products imported into the country for consumption by Swedish people.

Sweden has cut its annual carbon emissions by 23% since 1990, and generates more than half of its electricity from renewable sources. However, emissions linked to consumption have risen. Bolund said the policy reflects international trends such as the ‘maker movement’ and the sharing economy, both of which have strong followings there.

“The Swedish government’s proposal to introduce tax breaks for repairs is highly commendable,” says MBA’s CEO, Richard McCombs. “Similar initiatives could be replicated across Europe including incentives for companies to source more recycled materials for new products.”

Five minutes with Brian Riise, MBA’s Director of Research and Development…

1. Could you describe your role and responsibilities at MBA Polymers?

Since coming to MBA Polymers over 18 years ago, my main focus has been on developing high quality products suitable for a broad range of customers. This has included developing novel separation processes as well as formulations with suitable additives. My role has more recently expanded to providing technical and marketing support to our manufacturing plants. I give guidance on operating separation and compounding equipment, and ensuring reliability of product testing, as well as supporting technical sales, and presenting at conferences. Over the past decade, I have also been responsible for managing MBA Polymers’ intellectual property, including our patent portfolio and protection of trade secrets.

2. How does MBA work with its customers to tailor the characteristics of their products?

The first step is to make sure the customer is seeking one of the plastics we produce. We then determine the customer’s requirements in terms of price, colour, mechanical properties, thermal properties, flammability etc. We compare their requirements with our base material’s properties, and use our knowledge of additives and processes to assess the technical and economic feasibility of developing a suitable product. If the development is feasible, we produce a ‘developmental’ grade (or grades) for the customer to test. In some cases, this means collaborating with customers over several months to provide a grade that meets all their requirements.

3. Could you share an example?

One customer required a polypropylene product that was dark grey in colour, had a high melt flow rate and had to pass various mechanical tests including drop tests and creep resistance. We drew on our extensive experience of fine-tuning our products’ characteristics to control the melt flow rate and use of additives, producing the right colour and improving the creep resistance.

4. What plastics recycling challenges do you face and how are you working to overcome them?

One of the biggest product quality challenges is limiting the volume of non-melting contaminants in the final product. We can eliminate the vast majority, but there are sometimes tiny specks that end up in the products. We take steps to ensure that our separation equipment is in order, and work with engineers and operators at each of our facilities to make sure they are operating the equipment correctly.

5. What are your ambitions for the business?

With customers increasingly keen to order more recycled plastics, in line with their circular economy or sustainability targets, there is a huge opportunity for expanding the business. In order to meet customer demands, we will continue developing new sources of raw material for recycling. We will improve our product quality, expand the range of plastics we recover (as we have already done with PC/ABS), and strengthen our ability to provide high level technical support to our customers.